Academic Board

Danielle Allen
Roger Ames
Stephen C. Angle
Kwame Anthony Appiah
Julian Baggini
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Danielle Allen
BPCC Academic Board
Danielle Allen is a renowned political philosopher and MacArthur Genius with the powerful ability to connect us to complex ideas about democracy, citizenship, and justice. Whether speaking on American educational policy, equality and ethics in the digital age, or the nation’s founding documents, Allen is a bold, incisive scholar who challenges us to look beyond what we think we know. 

Danielle Allen is a path-breaking analyst of history and contemporary events and a leader in higher education. She is currently Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University as well as Professor in Harvard’s Department of Government and Graduate School of Education. Before joining Harvard, she was UPS Foundation Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, the first African American faculty member to be appointed to the Institute that was Einstein’s home for two decades. She is also a contributing columnist for the Washington Post. 

Allen is the author of five books, including Talking to Strangers: Anxieties of Citizenship since Brown v. Board of Education and Our Declaration: a Reading of the Declaration of Independence in Defense of Equality, which won the Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians and the Chicago Tribune’s Heartland Prize for Nonfiction, and was called “a tour de force” by The New York Review of Books. Her upcoming book, Education and Equality, scheduled for release in 2016, offers a critical clarification of just how important education is to democratic life, as well as a stirring defense of the humanities. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, and a 2001 winner of a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship.
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Roger Ames
BPCC Fellow, BPCC Academic Board

Roger Ames is professor of philosophy and editor of “Philosophy East & West” at University of Hawai‘i at Manoa. His recent publications include translations of Chinese classics. He has also authored many interpretative studies of Chinese philosophy and culture: “Thinking Through Confucius” (1987), “Anticipating China: Thinking Through the Narratives of Chinese and Western Culture” (1995), and “Thinking From the Han: Self, Truth, and Transcendence in Chinese and Western Culture” (1997).

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Stephen C. Angle
BPCC Academic Board

Stephen C. Angle received his B.A. from Yale University in East Asian Studies and his Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Michigan. Since 1994 he has taught at Wesleyan University, where he is now Professor of Philosophy and Chair of Wesleyan’s new College of East Asian Studies. In March of 2010, Angle presented the inaugural Tang Junyi Lecture Series at the University of Michigan. Together with Michael Slote, in the Summer of 2008 Angle co-directed an NEH Summer Seminar on “Traditions Into Dialogue: Confucianism and Contemporary Virtue Ethics,” which introduced 15 philosophers trained in Western virtue ethics to the Confucian tradition. Angle is a recipient of a Fulbright Research Grant, a Millicent C. McIntosh Fellowship, a Chiang Ching-Kuo Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, and the Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching, and he is a past President of the International Society for Comparative Study of Chinese and Western Philosophy. Angle is the author of Human Rights and Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry (Cambridge, 2002), Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy (Oxford, 2009), and Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism (Polity, 2012), as well as co-editor and co-translator, with Marina Svensson, of The Chinese Human Rights Reader (M.E. Sharpe, 2001), and co-editor, with Michael Slote, of Virtue Ethics and Confucianism (Routledge, 2013). 

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Kwame Anthony Appiah
BPCC Academic Board

Kwame Anthony Appiah teaches philosophy at NYU, in the Faculty of Arts and Science (FAS) and the Law School; he has taught previously at Princeton, Harvard, Duke, Cornell, Yale, Cambridge and the University of Ghana. He grew up in Ghana and was educated at Cambridge University, where he took undergraduate and doctoral degrees in philosophy. He has written widely in philosophy of mind and language, ethics and political philosophy, and the philosophy of art, of culture and of the social sciences; as well as in literary studies, where his focus has been on African and African-American literature. His current research focuses on questions about the connection between theory and practice in moral life. Professor Appiah is the editor, with Henry Louis Gates Jr., of the five-volume Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African-American Experience (Oxford University Press, 2005). In 1992, he published the prize-winning In My Father’s House: Africa in the Philosophy of Culture. His recent publications include The Ethics of Identity (Princeton University Press, 2005), Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers (Norton, 2006), Experiments in Ethics (Harvard University Press, 2009), The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen (Norton, 2010), and Lines of Descent: W. E. B. Du Bois and the Invention of Identity (Harvard 2014). Several of these books are available in translation into Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Korean, and Turkish, as well as a variety of other European languages. A Decent Respect: Honor in the Life of People and of Nations, based on the 2013 Hochelaga Lectures at the University of Hong Kong, is forthcoming from the University of Hong Kong Press

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Julian Baggini
BPCC Academic Board

Julian Baggini is the founding editor of The Philosophers’ Magazine. He has a PhD on the philosophy of personal identity and is the author, co-author or editor of over 20 books including The Ego Trick, Welcome to Everytown and, most recently, The Virtues of the Table (all Granta). He has written for numerous newspapers and magazines, as well as for the think tanks The Institute of Public Policy Research, Demos and Counterpoint. He has also appeared as a character in two Alexander McCall-Smith novels. His website is www.microphilosophy.net.

Tongdong Bai
Zvi Ben-Dor Benite
Rajeev Bhargava
Luc Ferry
Jonardon Ganeri
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Tongdong Bai
BPCC Academic Board

Dr. Tongdong Bai is a full professor and the Dongfang Chair Professor at the School of Philosophy at Fudan University in China.  He held a bachelor degree in nuclear physics and a master degree in the philosophy of science from Peking University, and obtained his doctoral degree in philosophy from Boston University.  He was a tenured associate professor at Xavier University in Cincinnati before he moved to Fudan.  He was the first and so far the only tenured philosophy teacher from the U.S. who has returned to China as a full time faculty member.  His research interests include Chinese philosophy and political philosophy, especially the comparative and contemporary relevance of traditional Chinese political philosophy.  He has published many articles in some prestigious journals in these areas, and has a book out in Chinese by the Peking University Press.  He has worked on the English and revised version of this book, Confucianism to Save the World: the Contemporary Relevance of “Classical” Confucian Political Philosophy.  He has also published a book in English, an introduction to traditional Chinese political philosophy that is presented from a comparative perspective, showing its contemporary relevance (China: The Political Philosophy of the Middle Kingdom, Zed Books).  At Fudan, he launched and has been running a highly successful MA, Visiting Student, and Auditing program in Chinese philosophy with courses taught in English that is intended to promote the studies of Chinese philosophy in the world.  He delivers lectures, in Chinese and English, in different venues, and is also involved in other social activities and organizations, all of which aim to promote new political norms that are informed and inspired by traditional Chinese philosophy and comparative political philosophy.  

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Zvi Ben-Dor Benite
BPCC Academic Board

Zvi Ben-Dor Benite received his Ph.D. in history from UCLA in 2000. Focusing on the question of interaction between religions in world history, he is the author of The Dao of Muhammad: A Cultural History of Muslims in Late Imperial China (Harvard, 2005); of The Ten Lost Tribes: A World History (Oxford, 2009); and co-editor of Modern Middle Eastern Jewish Thought: Writings on Identity, Culture, and Politics (Brandeis, 2013). Ben-Dor Benite is currently working on an edited volume on Sovereignty (forthcoming with Columbia University Press), and on a monograph Crescent China: Islam and the Nation After Empire (for Oxford University Press). 

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Rajeev Bhargava
BPCC Fellow, Academic Board

Rajeev Bhargava is currently Director of the Institute of Indian Thought at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies (CSDS). He was previously Director of CSDS. He has been a Professor at the Centre for Political Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, and between 2001 and 2005 was Head, Department of Political Science, University of Delhi. Bhargava did his BA in economics from the University of Delhi, and MPhil and DPhil from Oxford University. He has been a Fellow at Harvard University, University of Bristol, Institute of Advanced Studies, Jerusalem, Wissenschaftskolleg, Berlin, and the Institute for Human Sciences, Vienna. He has also been Distinguished Resident Scholar, Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life,Columbia University, and Asia Chair at Sciences Po, Paris. Bhargava has held visiting professorships at several universities. Bhargava’s publications include Individualism in Social Science (1992), What is Political Theory and Why Do We Need It? (2010), and The Promise of India’s Secular Democracy (2010). His edited works are Secularism and Its Critics (1998) and Politics and Ethics of the Indian Constitution (2008). His work on secularism and methodological individualism is internationally acclaimed. He has contributed to the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Oxford Handbook of Political Theory. Bhargava is on the advisory board of several national and international institutions, and was a consultant for the UNDP report on cultural liberty.

Luc ferry
Luc Ferry
BPCC Academic Board

Luc Ferry is a French philosopher and a notable proponent of Secular Humanism. He is a former member of the Saint-Simon Foundation think-tank.

Ferry received an Agrégation de philosophie (1975), a Doctorat d’Etat en science politique (1981), and an Agrégation de science politique (1982). As a Professor of political science and political philosophy, Ferry taught at the Institut d'études politiques de Lyon (1982–1988) — during which time he also taught and directed graduate research at the Pantheon-Sorbonne University —, at Caen University (1989–96). He was a professor at Paris Diderot University (since 1996) but did not teach there.

From 2002 and until 2004 he served as the Minister of Education on the cabinet led by Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin. During his tenure, he was the minister in charge of the implementation of the French law on secularity and conspicuous religious symbols in schools. He received the award of Docteur honoris causa from the Université de Sherbrooke (Canada). He was the 2013 Telesio Galilei Academy of science Laureate for Philosophy. 

Ganeri
Jonardon Ganeri
BPCC Academic Board Member
Jonardon Ganeri is a Global Network Professor of Philosophy, New York University, Visiting Professor of Philosophy, King’s College London, and Professorial Research Associate, SOAS London. His research interests are in consciousness, self, attention, the epistemology of inquiry, the idea of philosophy as a practice and its relationship with literary form, case-based reasoning, multiple-category ontologies, non-classical logics, realism in the theory of meaning, the history of ideas in early modern South Asia, the polycentricity of modernity, cosmopolitanism and cross-cultural hermeneutics, intellectual affinities between India, Greece and China, and early Buddhist philosophy of mind. I teach courses in the philosophy of mind, the nature of subjectivity, Buddhist philosophy, the history of Indian philosophical traditions, and supervise PhDs on Indian philosophical texts in classical Sanskrit. My books include Attention, Not Self; The Self: Naturalism, Consciousness, and the First-Person Stance; The Lost Age of Reason: Philosophy in Early Modern India 1450–1700; The Concealed Art of the Soul; and Philosophy in Classical India: The Proper Work of Reason. I have published in Mind, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, the Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Isis, New Literary History, Philosophy and Literature, Synthese, Analysis, Philosophy, in major Indology journals, and I am on the editorial boards of The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Philosophy East & West, Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research, the Journal of Hindu Studies and other journals and monograph series. I am currently editing the Oxford Handbook of Indian Philosophy, drafting scripts about Indian Philosophy for the podcast History of Philosophy without any Gaps, and thinking about philosophy, cosmopolitanism, and anti-coloniality. I advocate an expanded role for cross-cultural methodologies in philosophical research, together with enhanced cultural diversity in the philosophical curriculum. I strive to collaborate with philosophers, phenomenologists, cognitive scientists, historians, anthropologists, sinologists, persianists, buddhologists, classicists, and logicians. I am a Fellow of the British Academy, and laureate of the Infosys Prize in the Humanities. I have been named by Open Magazine one of India’s “50 Open Minds” in 2016.


John Gray
Jens Halfwassen
Francois Jullien
Anton Friedrich Koch
Chenyang Li
John gray
John Gray
21st Century Council, BPCC Advisory Board

John Gray is an English political philosopher with interests in analytic philosophy and the history of ideas.[1] He retired as School Professor of European Thought at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Gray contributes regularly to The GuardianThe Times Literary Supplement and the New Statesman, where he is the lead book reviewer.

Gray has written several influential books, including False Dawn: The Delusions of Global Capitalism (1998), Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals (2003), and Black Mass: Apocalyptic Religion and the Death of Utopia (2007). False Dawn has been translated into sixteen languages.

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Jens Halfwassen
BPCC Academic Board

Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Jens Halfwassen, born in 1958, studied Philosophy, History, Classics and Education, PhD in 1989 and Habilitation in 1995 at the University of Cologne,  after Positions as Heisen­berg-Professor of the DFG (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) and as Professor of Philo­sophy at the University of Munich since 1999 Chair (Ordinarius) of Philosophy and Director of the Philosophy Department at Heidelberg University. Member of the Heidelberg Academy of Letters and Sciences (Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften) und of the Academia Platonica Septima Monasteriensis. Meimberg-Prize of the Academy of Letters, Sciences and Arts of Mainz in 2003, Honorary Doctor of Philosophy oft the National University of Athens 2014, Fellow of Collegium Budapest and of Marsilius Kolleg Heidelberg. – The most significant publi­cations are Der Aufstieg zum Einen. Untersuchungen zu Platon und Plotin (1992, second edi­tion 2006), Geist und Selbstbewußtsein. Studien zu Plotin und Numenios (1994), Hegel und der spätantike Neuplatonismus (1999, second edition in 2005). Plotin und der Neuplatonis­mus, 2004 (Plotinus and the Neoplatonism. Translated by Carl Sean O’Brien. The English version will be published by Cambridge University Press). The newest book is Auf den Spuren des Einen. Aufsätze zur Metaphysik und ihrer Geschichte, forthcoming 2015. Numerous essays and articles about ancient, medieval and idealistic philosophy (e.g. about Xenophanes, Parmenides, Plato, Speusippus, Aristotle, Plotinus, Proclus, Dionysius Areopagita, Eriugena, Anselmus of Canterbury, Master Eckhart, Nicolaus Cusanus, Hegel, Schelling).

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Francois Jullien
BPCC Academic Board

François Jullien is a Professor at Paris Diderot University and director of the Institute of Contemporary Thought and the Marcel Granet Center. He is also a senior member of the Institut Universitaire de France. Jullien was President of the French Association for Chinese Studies (from 1988 to 1990), director of the East Asian Department of the University of Paris VII (1990–2000) and is former President of the Assembly of Collège international de philosophie (1995–1998). He is the author of Detour and Access: Strategies of Meaning in China and Greece, The Propensity of Things: Toward a History of Efficacy in China, and In Praise of Blandness: Proceeding from Chinese Thought and Aesthetics all published by Zone Books. 

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Anton Friedrich Koch
BPCC Academic Board

Prof. Dr. Anton Friedrich Koch was born in 1952 in Giessen, Germany. He studied philosophy and German language and literature at the Universität Heidelberg where he has served as professor of Philosophy since 2009. 

Prior to his current position, Koch taught at the Universität München as an assistant professor from 1982–1991 and then as a professor at the Universität Halle-Wittenberg in Halle, Saxony-Anhalt, from 1991–1996. He taught (and was Dean for two years) at the Universität Tübin­gen in Baden-Württem­berg from 1996-2008.

Since 2008, Koch has been a member of the Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften, the Academy of Sciences and Humanities of the Land Baden-Württemberg.

Koch was a visiting professor at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia in 2009. He was also a visiting professor at Ren Min University in Beijing and Fudan University in Shanghai, China in 2012. In the spring of 2013 and spring of 2014 he was a visiting professor at Huaqiao University in Xiamen, China.

Koch resides in Heidelberg and in Tübingen, Germany.

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Chenyang Li
BPCC Fellow, Academic Board
Chenyang Li is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, where he also founded and directs the Philosophy program. He has previously served as Professor and Chair of the Philosophy Department at Central Washington University (USA), where he received the University Distinguished Research Professor Award, Outstanding Department Chair Award, and the Key to Success Award (Student Service). His main research interests are Chinese philosophy and comparative philosophy. He has published 9 books, including The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony (2013), The Tao Encounters the West: Explorations in Comparative Philosophy (1999), The Sage and the Second Sex (ed. 2000), The East Asian Challenge for Democracy: Political Meritocracy in Comparative Perspective (co-edited with Daniel Bell, 2013), Moral Cultivation and Confucian Character: Engaging Joel J. Kupperman (co-edited with Peimin Ni, 2014), and over 100 journal articles and book chapters in such venues as Philosophy East and West, Journal of Chinese Philosophy, Asian Philosophy, Review of Metaphysics, Journal of Value Inquiry, Hypathia, International Philosophical Quarterly, Philosophia, and Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy. He was an ACE fellow (2008-2009) and the first president of the Association of Chinese Philosophers in Northern America (1995-1997). He is currently Vice President of the International Society for Chinese Philosophy and serves on the editorial/academic boards of 22 publications and scholarly organizations.
Lydia Liu
Stephen Macedo
Josiah Ober
Philip Pettit
Michael Puett
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Lydia Liu
BPCC Academic Board

Lydia Liu is the Wun Tsun Tam Professor in the Humanities, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University. Liu’s research has focused on cross-cultural exchange in recent history; the movement of words, theories, and artifacts across national boundaries; and the evolution of writing, textuality, and technology. Her recent collaboration with Rebecca Karl and Dorothy, The Birth of Chinese Feminism: Essential Texts in Transnational Feminism, appeared in print in the Weatherhead Books on Asia series, published by Columbia University Press in 2013. As a creative writer, she recently published The Nesbit Code (in Chinese) with Oxford University Press in Hong Kong. Professor Liu is the author of The Freudian Robot: Digital Media and the Future of the Unconscious (University of Chicago Press 2010). Her other books include The Clash of Empires: The Invention of China in Modern World Making (2004); and Writing and Materiality in China (co-edited with Judith Zeitlin, 2003). Liu was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship (1997–1998) and a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin (2004–2005); in 2013, she was the Class of 1932 Fellow in the Humanities Council at Princeton University. Liu founded a new Tsinghua-Columbia Center for Translingual and Transcultural Studies (CTTS) at Tsinghua University.

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Stephen Macedo
BPCC Academic Board

Stephen Macedo is the Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Politics and the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University, where he has also been the Founding Director of the Program on Law and Public Affairs (1999-2001), and the Director of the University Center for Human Values (2001-2009).  He writes and teaches on political theory, ethics, American constitutionalism, and public policy.  His books include Liberal Virtues: Citizenship, Virtue, and Community in Liberal Constitutionalism (Oxford University, 1990); Diversity and Distrust: Civic Education in a Multicultural Democracy (Harvard University, 2000); the co-authored Democracy at Risk: How Political Choices Undermine Citizen Participation, and What We Can Do About It (Brookings Institution Press, 2005), and the forthcoming, Just Married: Same-Sex Couples, Monogamy, and the Future of Marriage (Princeton University Press, 2015).  He is editor or co-editor of 15 books on topics ranging from the legacy of the 1960’s to universal jurisdiction in international law.  He has been Vice President of the American Political Science Association and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

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Josiah Ober
BPCC Academic Board

Josiah Ober, Mitsotakis Professor of Political Science and Classics at Stanford University, works on historical institutionalism and political theory, focusing on the political thought and practice of the ancient Greek world and its contemporary relevance. He is the author of a number of books mostly published by Princeton University Press, including Mass and Elite in Democratic Athens (1989), Political Dissent in Democratic Athens (2008), Democracy and Knowledge (2008), and The Rise and Fall of Classical Greece (forthcoming 2015). He has also published about 75 articles and chapters, including recent articles in American Political Science Review, Philosophical Studies, Hesperia, Polis, and Transactions of the American Philological Association.

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Philip Pettit
PHILIP PETTIT is L.S.Rockefeller University Professor of Human Values, Princeton, and Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Australian National University. Raised in Ireland, he has held positions on both sides of the border as well as in a number of other countries. He is best known for his articulation and defence of civic republican ideas, building carefully on the history of the tradition. Republicanism (Oxford 1997) has been translated into over a dozen languages and has been followed up by other works that develop the core ideas, most recently Just Freedom (Norton, 2014). 

President Zapatero of Spain embraced republican principles in his first term of government, 2004-08, and invited Pettit, in a public exchange in Madrid, July 2004, to do a review before the subsequent election of how far his administration had conformed to those principles. This review, presented publicly in July 2007, and published in Spanish in 2008, is included in a joint book with the Spanish legal theorist, Jose Marti, A Political Philosophy in Public Life: Civic Republicanism in Zapatero's Spain (Princeton 2010). 

Pettit works in a wide range of philosophical areas and his other books include The Common Mind (1993,)The Economy of Esteem (2004) with
G.Brennan; Group Agency (2011) with C. List; On the People’s Terms (2012); and The Robust Demands of the Good (2015). Common Minds: Themes from the Philosophy of Philip Pettit, ed G.Brennan et al, appeared from Oxford in 2007. Philip Pettit – Five Themes from his Work, ed S.Derpmann and D.Schweikard, appeared from Springer in 2016.
Puett
Michael Puett
Michael Puett is the Walter C. Klein Professor of Chinese History in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University. His interests are focused on the inter-relations between philosophy, anthropology, history, and religion, with the hope of bringing the study of China into larger comparative frameworks. He is the author of The Ambivalence of Creation: Debates Concerning Innovation and Artifice in Early China and To Become a God: Cosmology, Sacrifice, and Self-Divinization in Early China.  He is also the co-author, with Adam Seligman, Robert Weller, and Bennett Simon, of Ritual and its Consequences: An Essay on the Limits of Sincerity, as well as the co-author, with Christine Gross-Loh, of The Path: What Chinese Philosophy Can Teach Us About the Good Life.
Mathias Risse
Thomas Sheehan
Alison Simmons
Peter Sloterdijk
Richard Sorabji
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Mathias Risse
Academic Board

Mathias Risse is Professor of Philosophy and Public Policy. He works mostly in social and political philosophy and in ethics. His primary research areas are contemporary political philosophy (in particular questions of international justice, distributive justice, and property) and decision theory (in particular, rationality and fairness in group decision making, an area sometimes called analytical social philosophy.) His articles have appeared in journals such as Ethics; Philosophy and Public Affairs; Nous; the Journal of Political Philosophy; and Social Choice and Welfare. Risse studied philosophy, mathematics, and mathematical economics at the University of Bielefeld, the University of Pittsburgh, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and Princeton University. He received his BA, BS and MS in mathematics from Bielefeld, and his MA and PhD in philosophy from Princeton. Before coming to Harvard he taught in the Department of Philosophy and the Program in Ethics, Politics and Economics at Yale. His books On Global Justice and Global Political Philosophy were both published in 2012.

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Thomas Sheehan
BPCC Academic Board

Thomas Sheehan specializes in contemporary European philosophy and its relation to religious questions, with particular interests in Heidegger and Roman Catholicism. His books include: Martin Heidegger, Logic: The Question of Truth (trans., 2007); Becoming Heidegger (2007); Edmund Husserl: Psychological and Transcendental Phenomenology and the Encounter with Heidegger (1997); Karl Rahner: The Philosophical Foundations (1987); The First Coming: How the Kingdom of God Became Christianity (1986); and Heidegger, the Man and the Thinker (1981).

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Alison Simmons
BPCC Academic Board

Alison Simmons is the Samuel H. Wolcott Professor of Philosophy and Harvard College Professor at Harvard University. She received her Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Pennsylvania in 1994.  Her primary area of research and teaching is early modern (17th and 18th century) philosophy, with a particular focus on theories of mind, the relationship between mind and body, the relationship between mind and world, and the way our understanding of those relationships has changed from classical Greek to contemporary philosophy.  She is currently writing a book entitled Beyond Dualism: Descartes on the Human Condition. She is also editing an interdisciplinary book on consciousness for the Oxford Philosophical Concepts series. Recent articles include “Leibnizian Consciousness Re-Considered,” “Sensory Perception of Body: Meditation 6.5,” “Cartesian Consciousness Reconsidered,” “Re-Humanizing Descartes,” “Sensation in the Malebranchean Mind,” and “Guarding the Body:  A Cartesian Phenomenology of Perception.” At Harvard, Professor Simmons was co-chair of the 2006-2007 Task Force on General Education, which drafted a new program of general education for Harvard College.

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Peter Sloterdijk
BPCC Academic Board

Peter Sloterdijk was born in 1947 in Karlsruhe, Germany. From 1968-74 he studied at the Academic Studies of Philosophy and German philology in Munich. In 1975 he received his conferral of a doctorate in philosophy and history of modern autobiographic literature in Hamburg. Since 1980, Sloterdijk has been a freelance writer with publications in various papers on questions about Time Diagnostics, Culture and Religion, Philosophy, Art Theory and Psychology. From 1989 to 2008 he was director of the Institute for Cultural Philosophy at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna. Since 1992 he has been Professor of Philosophy and Media Theory at the Karlsruhe University of Arts and Design. Since 2001 he was Rector of the Karlsruhe University of Arts and Design. From 2002 to 2012, Sloterdijk was host of the broadcast program: “Das Philosophische Quartett”, together with Rüdiger Safranski, on ZDF.

Richard sorabji
Richard Sorabji
Richard Sorabji, is Honorary Fellow of Wolfson College, Oxford. He enjoys teaching and has had many doctoral students and postdoctoral colleagues, while Professor of Philosophy at Cornell University and King’s College, London, Director of the Institute of Classical Studies in the University of London, Gresham Professor of Rhetoric, Global Distinguished Professor in Classics at NYU and repeatedly visiting Professor of Philosophy at the Graduate Center of the City University, New York, and at Austin Texas. He is interested in the history of philosophy partly for the contribution it makes to philosophical issues of the present. His 15 books include, besides two biographies, three books on ideas concerning the physical universe, Necessity, Cause and Blame; Time, Creation and the Continuum; Matter, Space and Motion. 

Others books are concerned with mind and ethics, Animal Minds and Human Morals; Emotion and Peace of Mind (From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation); Self (Ancient and Modern Insights about Individuality, Life and Death); Gandhi and the Stoics (Modern Experiments on Ancient Values); Moral Conscience through the Ages (Fifth Century BCE to the Present). 

Starting from an interest in Aristotle, he has moved to an interest in the next thousand years of Ancient Greek Philosophy, and has edited a series of over 100 volumes of English translation of this later Greek Philosophy, involving collaborators in 20 countries, together with 6 edited volumes explaining this period of thought. He is also interested in the spread of Greek Philosophy to other cultures, through Persian and Syriac to Arabic and back to the Latin-speaking world. He has for some time and increasingly worked with experts in Islamic and Indian Philosophy comparing ideas from the Greek and from some of the subsequent Western tradition. His interest in the Philosophy of other cultures is represented in his co-edited, The Ethics of War (Shared Problems in Different Traditions), as well as in his book on the ethical views of Gandhi. Two books edited in 2016 describe some of the spread of Greek Philosophy to other cultures: Aristotle Re-Interpreted (New Findings) and Priscian, Answers to King Khosroes of Persia, a translation by many hands.

He was knighted in 2014 for services to philosophical scholarship. 

Galen Strawson
Sigridur Thorgeirsdottir
Justin Tiwald
Weiming Tu
Michael Walzer
Galen strawson 2012 july melbourne gs 2
Galen Strawson
BPCC Academic Board

Galen Strawson taught at Oxford University from 1979 to 2000 and was a Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford from 1987­ to 2000. From 2001 to 2013 he was Professor of Philosophy at Reading University, and from 2004 to 2007 he was Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the City University of New York Graduate Center. He currently holds the President’s Chair of Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin.

He has held Visiting Professorships at New York University, Rutgers University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Princeton University (Humanities Council Old Dominion Fellow), and the Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris. He has held visiting research positions at the Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, and the University of Copenhagen.

Strawson’s primary research interests include Metaphysics, Philosophy of Mind, Early Modern Philosophy, Kant, and Ethics. He has written in particular on free will, the self, consciousness, physicalism, causation, intentionality, narrative, Hume and Locke.

His books include Freedom and Belief (1986, revised edition 1991, new 2nd edition 2010); The Secret Connexion: Causation, Realism, and David Hume (Oxford: Clarendon Press 1989, revised paperback editions 1992, 1996, 2003, new 2nd edition 2014); Mental Reality (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press 1994, paperback edition 1996, Spanish translation 1997, new 2nd edition 2009), Selves: An Essay in Revisionary Metaphysics (2009, revised edition 2011); Locke on personal identity: Consciousness and Concernment (2011, 2nd edition 2014); and The Evident Connexion: Hume on personal identity (2011, 2nd edition 2014).

He is editor of The Self? (Oxford: Blackwell 2005), principal author of Consciousness and its Place in Nature (Imprint Academic 2006).

He has also published many articles in philosophy journals and collections. In addition to these scholarly articles, he has published essays and reviews in periodicals such as the Financial Times, The Guardian, The Observer, The Sunday Times, The Independent, theNew York Times Book Review, the London Review of Books, and the Times Literary Supplement. He has appeared on film, television, and radio.

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Sigridur Thorgeirsdottir
BPCC Academic Board
Sigridur Thorgeirsdottir is professor of philosophy at the University of Iceland. She studied philosophy in Boston and Berlin, and has also taught philosophy in Germany and Finland, most recently as Jane and Aatos Erkko professor at the University of Helsinki. As a specialist in German philosophy, she has especially written extensively on the philosophy of Nietzsche and is on the scientific board of the Nietzsche Studien. She has done pioneering work on questions of Nietzsche and gender, as well as research into the reception of Nietzsche's philosophy in the philosophies of Beauvoir, Arendt, Irigaray and Butler. She has also published on women in the history of philosophy, hence participating in efforts of introducing "forgotten" women philosophers to the philosophical canon and curricula. As a native of Iceland, she is interested in the philosophy of nature, has periodically been active in the environmental movement and written on issues of environmental concern. Presently she is writing a book on the philosophy of the body, displaying how the body has been a missing link in Western philosophy. The body opens for the possibility of a richer understanding of „man“ as epistemic, moral and political subject, most importantly by accommodating for sexual difference. Sigridur Thorgeirsdottir has done work within feminist philosophy both on theoretical and practical levels. She is one of the founders and first chair of board of the United Nations University Gender Equality Studies and Training Program (www.gest.unu.edu), a transnational program on gender equality, with students from Africa, Asia and the Middle East. Along with Nordic colleagues, she leads the Gender and Philosophy Summer School Program (made possible by an Erasmus, European Union grant), introducing novel pedagogical methods in philosophy on the basis of gender-work in philosophy (www.genderandphilosophy.hi.is). She is on the board of FISP, the International Federation of Philosophical Societies (www.fisp.org), and chair of the newly established committee for gender issues of FISP, with FISP presently organizing the upcoming World Congress of Philosophy to be held in Beijing in the summer of 2018.
 

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Justin Tiwald
BPCC Academic Board

Justin Tiwald is a philosopher who works at the intersections of ethics, political philosophy and traditional Chinese philosophy, with particular interests in Chinese and Western notions of empathy, virtue, well-being, and rights. He is Associate Professor of Philosophy at San Francisco State University and has been a visiting professor at the University of California Berkeley. His recent publications include Readings in Later Chinese Philosophy: Han to the 20th Century (Hackett 2014) and Ritual and Religion in the Xunzi (SUNY 2014).

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Weiming Tu
BPCC Academic Board

Dr. Tu Weiming is a Lifelong Professor of Philosophy, Director of the Institute for Advanced Humanistic Studies at Peking University, and Research Professor and Senior Fellow of Asia Center at Harvard University. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Dr. Tu is a leading expert on Confucianism and Neo-confucianism. A proponent of the idea of “Cultural China,” which attempts to understand what it means to be Chinese within a world context, Dr. Tu is currently interpreting Confucian ethics as a spiritual resource for the emerging global community.

Professor Tu Weiming is the author of Neo-Confucian Thought in Action: Wang Yangming’s Youth (1976), Centrality and Commonality: An Essay on Confucian Religiousness (1976, rev.1989), Humanity and Self-Cultivation (1979),Confucian Thought: Selfhood as Creative Transformation (1985), Way, Learning, and Politics: Essays on the Confucian Intellectual (1993), Confucianism (2008), the Global Significance of Concrete Humanity: Essays on the Confucian Discourse in Cultural China (2010), Confucianism in the 21st Century (2014), etc.. His five-volume Anthology of Essays were published by Wuhan Press in 2011, eight-volume series of Collected Writingswere published by SDX Joint Publishing Company in 2013, and the entire Collected Worksbegan to be published by Peking University Press from 2013.

For his great contributions to humanity, Professor Tu Weiming was elected as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1988- ), an Executive Member of the Federation of International Philosophical Societies (FISP, 2008- ), and a Titular Member of the International Institute of Philosophy (IIP, 2010-, representing China).

He has been awarded honorary degrees from King’s College in London (UK), Lehigh University (US), Grand Valley (Michigan) State University (US), Soka University (Japan), Shandong University (China, the highest honor confirmed by the State Council of the PRC), Tunghai University (Taiwan), Lingnan University (Hong Kong), Macau University (Macau), etc. He is also the recipient of the Grand Prize of International T’oegye Society (Korea, 2001), the second Thomas Berry Award for Ecology and Religion (UN, 2002), Life Achievement Award by the American Humanist Society (US, 2007), the first Confucius Cultural Award (China, 2009), and the first Brilliance of China Award (China, 2013), Global Thinkers Forum “Prominence of Cultural Understanding” (Greece, 2013), China Cultural Figure (Macau, 2014) etc.

Michael walzer photo   credit jon r. friedman
Michael Walzer
BPCC Academic Board

Professor Emeritus of Social Science at Princeton University. As a professor, author, editor, and lecturer, Michael Walzer has addressed a wide variety of topics in political theory and moral philosophy: political obligation, just and unjust war, nationalism and ethnicity, economic justice and the welfare state.  His books (among them Just and Unjust Wars, Spheres of Justice, The Company of Critics, Thick and Thin: Moral Argument at Home and Abroad, On Toleration, and Politics and Passion) and essays have played a part in the revival of practical, issue-focused ethics and in the development of a pluralist approach to political and moral life.  Walzer is a contributing editor for The New Republic and co-editor of Dissent, now in its 59th year.  His articles and interviews appear frequently in the world’s foremost newspapers and journals. He is currently working on a series of lectures and then a book dealing with the successes and failures of “national liberation”--and also on the third volume of The Jewish Political Tradition, a comprehensive collaborative project focused on the history of Jewish political thought.  His most recent book is In God’s Shadow: Politics in the Hebrew Bible (Yale University Press, 2012). Photo by: Jon R. Friedman

Hui Wang
Melissa Williams
Bin Wong
Xudong Zhang
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Hui Wang
BPCC Academic Board

Mr. Hui Wang is a professor in both the Department of Chinese Language and Literature and the department of history, Director of the Tsinghua Institute for Advanced Study in Humanities and Social Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing.

His research focuses on contemporary Chinese intellectual history and Chinese literature. He was the executive editor (with Huang Ping) of the influential magazine “Dushu” from May 1996 to July 2007. The US magazine «Foreign Policy« named him as one of the top 100 public intellectuals in the world in May 2008.

Prof. Wang Hui is the recipient of many awards (including "2013 Luca Pacioli Prize" which he shares with Jurgen Habermas) for his scholarship and has been Visiting Professor at Harvard, Edinburgh, Bologna (Italy), Stanford, UCLA, Berkeley, and the University of Washington, among others. In March 2010, he appeared as the keynote speaker at the annual meeting for the Association of Asian Scholars.

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Melissa Williams
BPCC Academic Board

Melissa Williams teaches political theory at the University of Toronto, where she is Professor of Political Science and served as Founding Director of the Centre for Ethics from 2005-2010. Her work is focused in contemporary democratic theory with a focus on questions of political representation, structural inequality, and social diversity. She is author of Voice, Trust, and Memory: Marginalized Groups and the Failings of Liberal Representation (Princeton University Press), as well as articles on numerous topics ranging from the history of Western political thought, deliberative democracy, toleration, affirmative action, multiculturalism, and the rights of Indigenous peoples.  She was recently Editor of NOMOS, the Yearbook of the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy; volumes she has edited include Humanitarian Intervention, Toleration and Its Limits, Moral Universalism and Pluralism, and Transitional Justice (New York University Press).  Her current research focuses on theories of global justice and global democracy, and of the role of intercultural political theory in a globalizing world. The latter has led to research collaborations focused on Indigenous political thought, and she is leading an international research project on East Asian political thought. Williams continues to serve the Centre for Ethics as director of its “Ethics in Translation” pillar, which aims at enhancing philosophical engagement across culturally diverse traditions of ethics. 

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Bin Wong
BPCC Academic Board

Before coming to UCLA in 2004, Bin Wong served as Director of the Center for Asian Studies at UC Irvine where he was also Chancellor's Professor of History and Economics. At UCLA he is responsible for fostering collaborations with a strong Asian component across campus, nationally, and internationally.  These include new inter-disciplinary initiatives spanning research, graduate training, and class room curricula in K-16 settings.  Wong's own research has examined Chinese patterns of political, economic and social change, especially since eighteenth century, both within Asian regional contexts and compared with more familiar European patterns, as part of the larger scholarly efforts under way to make world history speak to contemporary conditions of globalization. Among his books, China Transformed: Historical Change and the Limits of European Experience (Cornell University Press, 1997) is the best known in its English and Chinese editions. Wong has also written or co-authored more than eighty articles published in North America, East Asia and Europe, published in Chinese, English, French, German and Japanese in journals that reach diverse audiences within and beyond academia. His most recent book, co-authored with Jean-Laurent Rosenthal, is Before and Beyond Divergence: The Politics of Economic Change in China and Europe (Harvard University Press, 2011); Chinese, French and Japanese translations are being made.  He has been a visiting professor and researcher at institutions in China, France, Japan, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.  Since 2009 he has been a Distinguished Guest Professor at the Fudan University Institute for Advanced Study in Social Sciences. 

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Xudong Zhang
BPCC Academic Board

Xudong Zhang was born in Beijing and educated at Peking and Duke.  He is Professor of Comparative Literature and Professor of East Asian Studies at New York University.  In his capacity as Cheung Kong Professor in the Humanities at Peking University, he directs the International Center for Critical Theory (ICCT), which has member centers or programs at PKU, NYU, East China Normal University (Shanghai), and University of Tokyo.  Among his ongoing concerns are the rethinking of critical theory in global, particularly non-Western, situations and contexts; modernism and modernity; aesthetics; political philosophy; and critical interpretation of Chinese literature and cultural politics.  Publishing in both English and Chinese, he is the author of Chinese Modernism in the Era of Reforms; The Order of the Imaginary-Critique on Modern Chinese Literary Discourse (in Chinese); Cultural Identity in the Age of Globalization-A Historical Critique of Western Discourse of Universalism (in Chinese); Postsocialism and Cultural Politics; and, co-authored with Mo Yan, Writing in Our Age