Fellows 2016

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Roger Ames
Stephen C. Angle
Tongdong Bai
Rajeev Bhargava
Ruth Chang
Roger ames 2
Roger Ames
BPCC Fellow, BPCC Academic Board

Roger Ames is professor of philosophy and editor of “Philosophy East & West” at University of Hawai‘i at Manoa. His recent publications include translations of Chinese classics. He has also authored many interpretative studies of Chinese philosophy and culture: “Thinking Through Confucius” (1987), “Anticipating China: Thinking Through the Narratives of Chinese and Western Culture” (1995), and “Thinking From the Han: Self, Truth, and Transcendence in Chinese and Western Culture” (1997).

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Stephen C. Angle
BPCC Academic Board

Stephen C. Angle received his B.A. from Yale University in East Asian Studies and his Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Michigan. Since 1994 he has taught at Wesleyan University, where he is now Professor of Philosophy and Chair of Wesleyan’s new College of East Asian Studies. In March of 2010, Angle presented the inaugural Tang Junyi Lecture Series at the University of Michigan. Together with Michael Slote, in the Summer of 2008 Angle co-directed an NEH Summer Seminar on “Traditions Into Dialogue: Confucianism and Contemporary Virtue Ethics,” which introduced 15 philosophers trained in Western virtue ethics to the Confucian tradition. Angle is a recipient of a Fulbright Research Grant, a Millicent C. McIntosh Fellowship, a Chiang Ching-Kuo Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, and the Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching, and he is a past President of the International Society for Comparative Study of Chinese and Western Philosophy. Angle is the author of Human Rights and Chinese Thought: A Cross-Cultural Inquiry (Cambridge, 2002), Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy (Oxford, 2009), and Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism (Polity, 2012), as well as co-editor and co-translator, with Marina Svensson, of The Chinese Human Rights Reader (M.E. Sharpe, 2001), and co-editor, with Michael Slote, of Virtue Ethics and Confucianism (Routledge, 2013). 

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Tongdong Bai
BPCC Academic Board

Dr. Tongdong Bai is a full professor and the Dongfang Chair Professor at the School of Philosophy at Fudan University in China.  He held a bachelor degree in nuclear physics and a master degree in the philosophy of science from Peking University, and obtained his doctoral degree in philosophy from Boston University.  He was a tenured associate professor at Xavier University in Cincinnati before he moved to Fudan.  He was the first and so far the only tenured philosophy teacher from the U.S. who has returned to China as a full time faculty member.  His research interests include Chinese philosophy and political philosophy, especially the comparative and contemporary relevance of traditional Chinese political philosophy.  He has published many articles in some prestigious journals in these areas, and has a book out in Chinese by the Peking University Press.  He has worked on the English and revised version of this book, Confucianism to Save the World: the Contemporary Relevance of “Classical” Confucian Political Philosophy.  He has also published a book in English, an introduction to traditional Chinese political philosophy that is presented from a comparative perspective, showing its contemporary relevance (China: The Political Philosophy of the Middle Kingdom, Zed Books).  At Fudan, he launched and has been running a highly successful MA, Visiting Student, and Auditing program in Chinese philosophy with courses taught in English that is intended to promote the studies of Chinese philosophy in the world.  He delivers lectures, in Chinese and English, in different venues, and is also involved in other social activities and organizations, all of which aim to promote new political norms that are informed and inspired by traditional Chinese philosophy and comparative political philosophy.  

Rajeev bhargav  photo 2
Rajeev Bhargava
BPCC Fellow, Academic Board

Rajeev Bhargava is currently Director of the Institute of Indian Thought at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies (CSDS). He was previously Director of CSDS. He has been a Professor at the Centre for Political Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, and between 2001 and 2005 was Head, Department of Political Science, University of Delhi. Bhargava did his BA in economics from the University of Delhi, and MPhil and DPhil from Oxford University. He has been a Fellow at Harvard University, University of Bristol, Institute of Advanced Studies, Jerusalem, Wissenschaftskolleg, Berlin, and the Institute for Human Sciences, Vienna. He has also been Distinguished Resident Scholar, Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life,Columbia University, and Asia Chair at Sciences Po, Paris. Bhargava has held visiting professorships at several universities. Bhargava’s publications include Individualism in Social Science (1992), What is Political Theory and Why Do We Need It? (2010), and The Promise of India’s Secular Democracy (2010). His edited works are Secularism and Its Critics (1998) and Politics and Ethics of the Indian Constitution (2008). His work on secularism and methodological individualism is internationally acclaimed. He has contributed to the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the Oxford Handbook of Political Theory. Bhargava is on the advisory board of several national and international institutions, and was a consultant for the UNDP report on cultural liberty.

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Ruth Chang
BPCC Fellow
RUTH CHANG is Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ. She has held visiting appointments in philosophy the University of California Los Angeles and in law at the University of Chicago Law School. She has a Ph.D. from Balliol College, Oxford University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Chang’s research focuses on how we can appropriately integrate multiple criteria of relevance in normative, epistemic, and scientific inquiry and the ways in which the reasons for and against options that are based on such criteria might relate. Her research has upshots for both individual and collective or institutional decision-making and has been the subject of articles and interviews by various media outlets around the world including the U.S., Canada, the U.K., Australia, Italy, Germany, Israel, Brazil, New Zealand, and Austria. She has been a consultant or lecturer for institutions and industries ranging from video gaming to pharmaceuticals to the Navy and World Bank.
Owen Flanagan
Sam Fleischacker
Eliza Griswold
Chaihark Hahm
Sungmoon Kim
Owenflanagan
Owen Flanagan
BPCC Fellow
OWEN FLANAGAN is James B. Duke University Professor at Duke University. His research is in the philosophy of mind, especially on the nature of consciousness, and in ethics and moral psychology.  His method is to look for intersections between philosophy and work in psychology and anthropology.  His is co-director of Duke’s Center for Comparative Philosophy.  An aim of his recent work is to explore the diversity of moral systems across the earth for the sake of improving cross-cultural understanding as well as for learning from other traditions.  Flanagan loves to learn from social scientists and fellow humanists about the contours of human nature and the unexplored possibility space for human development and moral and political improvement.
Samfleischacker
Sam Fleischacker
BPCC Fellow
SAM FLEISCHACKER is LAS Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of Illinois-Chicago (UIC).  He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1989, and taught from 1990 to 1999 at Williams College.  His books include On Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations (Princeton, 2004), A Short History of Distributive Justice (Harvard, 2004), Divine Teaching and the Way of the World (Oxford, 2011), What is Enlightenment? (Routledge, 2013), and The Good and the Good Book (Oxford, 2015).  He is at work at the moment on two projects, an elaboration of Adam Smith's understanding of empathy and an examination of the notion of peoplehood, and of how bonds to a people can be rendered compatible with liberalism.
Elizagriswold
Eliza Griswold
BPCC Fellow
Eliza Griswold is a poet and a journalist based in New York City. Her reportage and poems have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, the New Yorker, and the Atlantic, among others. She has been awarded a 2015 PEN Prize for her translations of the poems of Afghan women, I AM THE BEGGAR OF THE WORLD, and A 2010 Rome Prize for poetry. A recipient of the Lukas Prize for her 2010 book of reportage, The Tenth Parallel, Griswold has also held fellowships at Harvard University and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation.

Chaiharkhahm
Chaihark Hahm
BPCC Fellow
CHAIHARK HAHM is Professor of Law at Yonsei University School of Law. His research has revolved around the nexus of constitutional interpretation, democratic political theory, Confucian philosophy, comparative law, and legal history. His works in English have appeared in Journal of Democracy, American Journal of Comparative Law, and I•CON: International Journal of Constitutional Law, among others. He recently co-authored Making We the People: Democratic Constitutional Founding in Postwar Japan and Korea (Cambridge, 2015), which was a historically informed theoretical meditation on the relationship between popular sovereignty and constitutional founding. Previously, he has held fellowships at the National Endowment for Democracy and the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study/the Hague Institute for the Internationalization of Law. He holds law degrees from Seoul National University, Yale, Columbia, and Harvard, and a degree in theology from Yale.
Sungmoonkim
Sungmoon Kim
BPCC Fellow
SUNGMOON KIM is Professor of Political Theory in the Department of Public Policy at City University of Hong Kong and currently Associate Director of the Center for East Asian and Comparative Philosophy at City U. His research interests include comparative political theory, Confucian democratic theory, and the history of East Asian political thought. His research has been published or is forthcoming in journals such as American Political Science ReviewJournal of PoliticsBritish Journal of Political ScienceContemporary Political TheoryHistory of Political ThoughtJournal of the History of Ideas, and The Review of Politics, among others. Kim is the author of two books, Confucian Democracy in East Asia: Theory and Practice and Public Reason Confucianism: Democratic Perfectionism and Constitutionalism in East Asia, both published by Cambridge University Press.
Jin Li
Fenrong Liu
Samuel Moyn
Viren Murthy
Rafal K Stepien
Li  jin
Jin Li
BPCC Fellow
Dr. Jin Li is Professor of Education and Human Development at Brown University. Originally from China, she received her B.A. in German from Guangzhou Institute of Foreign Languages in 1982. She earned her first Ed.M. in education from the University of Pittsburgh in 1988, her second Ed.M. in Administrative Planning and Social Policy in 1991, and her Ed.D. in human development and psychology from Harvard University in 1997. Dr. Li’s research focuses on East Asian virtue-oriented and Western mind-oriented learning models and how these models shape children’s learning beliefs and achievement. She has studied children and families from Chinese, Taiwanese, Chinese American, European American, and other cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Her research has been funded by William T. Grant Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the Foundation for Child Development, and the Chiang Ching-Kuo Foundation. Her scholarly work has been published in leading professional journals. Dr. Li has delivered talks in a dozen different countries. Her recent book Cultural Foundations of Learning: East and West synthesizes related research over the past decades and offers new perspectives on the indispensable role of culture in human learning. Dr. Li is a Berggruen Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, 2015-2016.
Fenrong
Fenrong Liu
BPCC Fellow
FENRONG LIU is a full professor of logic at the department of philosophy at Tsinghua University, Beijing, and the holder of the first Amsterdam-China Visiting Chair for the period 2014-2019.  Recently, the Chinese Ministry of Education appointed her as a Changjiang Distinguished Professor, the highest academic honor in China. 

Fenrong's main research topic is the analysis of rational agency. She has  studied logical modeling of reasons for preference, preference dynamics, and interactions between different types of agents. She has published a number of papers and books on these topics, including "Reasoning about Preference Dynamics" (Springer 2011). Her most recent interest is information flow, reasoning, and decision making in social networks. Fenrong also has a growing interest in projects concerning the history of logic, with the aim of comparing Chinese and western styles of thinking in a systematic unbiased manner. She is currently editing a  "Handbook of the History of Logical Thought in China".
Samuelmoyn
Samuel Moyn
BPCC Fellow
SAMUEL MOYN is professor of law and professor of history at Harvard University. He is the author of several books in the fields of European history and legal history, including The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History (2010) and Christian Human Rights (2015).
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Viren Murthy
BPCC Fellow
VIREN MURTHY is Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  He teaches transnational Asian History and researches Chinese and Japanese intellectual history.  He is the author of The Political Philosophy of Zhang Taiyan: The Resistance of Consciousness (Brill, 2011) and co-editor with Axel Schneider of The Challenge of Linear Time: Nationhood and the Politics of History in East Asia (Brill, 2013), and co-editor with Prasenjit Duara and Andrew Sartori of A Companion to Global Historical Thought, (Blackwell, 2014).  He has published articles in Modern Intellectual History, Modern China, Frontiers of History in China and Positions: Asia Critique and is currently working on a project tentatively entitled: Pan-Asianism and the Conundrums of Post-colonial Modernity
Rafalkstepien
Rafal K Stepien
BPCC Fellow
Rafal K Stepien is a scholar of religion, philosophy, and literature. His research is inter-disciplinary, cross-regional, and poly-glottic, ranging among Buddhist and Islamic texts composed in Sanskrit, Chinese, Arabic, and Persian. Thus, he has been the Soudavar Memorial Research Scholar in Persian Studies at Cambridge, the Cihui Foundation Faculty Fellow in Chinese Buddhism at Columbia, and is now the Berggruen Research Fellow in Indian Philosophy at Oxford, where he will be completing a monograph in his primary fields of expertise: Indian and Chinese Buddhist ontology, epistemology, and ethics.

Stepien is Assistant Professor of Asian Religions at Hampshire College. He holds degrees from the University of Western Australia, Oxford, Cambridge, and Columbia, and has undertaken further studies at Harvard, Bologna, Damascus, Tehran, Peking, and Hong Kong Universities, among others. His work has appeared in peer-reviewed journals such as OriensInterdisciplinary Literary Studies, and the Journal of the Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies, and has won many awards, including from the Mellon Foundation; Institute for Religion, Culture, & Public Life; and Association for Asian Studies.
Anna Sun
Robin R. Wang
Sun  anna
Anna Sun
BPCC Fellow
Anna Sun, Associate Professor of Sociology and Asian Studies at Kenyon College, took her Ph.D. in sociology from Princeton University in 2008. Sun’s research focuses on the revival of Confucianism as a religion in contemporary China. She also works on larger conceptual and methodological issues in the study of Chinese religions, as well as the relationship between religion and politics. 

In 2010-11 she was awarded a fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, where she completed Confucianism as a World Religion: Contested Histories and Contemporary Realities (Princeton: 2013). This book received the “Distinguished Book Award” from the Sociology of Religion Section of the American Sociological Association, and the “Best First Book in the History of Religion Award” from the American Academy of Religion.

Sun was a Co-Principal Investigator in the research project “The Empirical Study of Religions in China,” 2006-2009. She is currently a Co-Principal Investigator in the project “The Concept of Fu (Blessed Happiness) in Contemporary China: Searching for Well-Being, Purpose, and the Good Life,” 2013-2016, for which she has been conducting ethnographic fieldwork on the social life of prayers in urban Shanghai. In 2015-16, she serves as the Chair of the Board of Directors of ASIANetwork, a consortium of 160 North American colleges with Asia Studies programs.

A Berggruen Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University in 2015-16 and at Schwarzman College, Tsinghua University  and the Harvard Divinity School in 2016-17.  Sun is now working on her new project on the return of religion in contemporary Chinese society and its consequences.
Robinwang
Robin R. Wang
BPCC Fellow
ROBIN R. WANG is a Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles and the President of international Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy. She is the author of an influential book: Yinyang: the Way of Heaven and Earth in Chinese Thought and Culture, (Cambridge University Press, 2012) and the editor of Chinese Philosophy in an Era of Globalization, (SUNY Press, 2004) and Images of Women in Chinese Thought and Culture: Writings from the Pre-Qin Period to the Song Dynasty (Hackett, 2003). Her current research focuses on a conceptual framework or a different model for thinking about a wider range of philosophical, cultural, and political problems in this globalized world. She has regularly given presentations in North America, Europe, and Asia and has also been a consultant for the media, law firms, museums, K-12 educators, and health care professionals. She was a credited Cultural Consultant for the movie Karate Kid, 2010.