Fellows 2015

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Yi-Huah Jiang
Chenyang Li
David B. Wong
Jiang  yi huah
Yi-Huah Jiang
BPCC Fellow
Yi-Huah Jiang received his BA and MA degrees from the National Taiwan University and his PhD in political science from Yale University. He previously taught political philosophy at the department of political science at National Taiwan University. From 2008 to 2014, he served as minister of research and evaluation commission; as minister of the interior; as vice premier; and finally as the premier of Taiwan. He is now a senior advisor to the president of Taiwan.

Jiang’s academic interests lie in political philosophy, democratic theory, general education, and Taiwanese politics. He is the author of Liberalism, Nationalism and National Identity (1998) and Essays on Liberalism and Democracy (2000). He earned Distinguished Teaching Award from National Taiwan University and Distinguished Research Award from the National Science Council of Taiwan in 2002.

During his public service years, Jiang launched the master plan to streamline the central government; enhanced the welfare benefits for the poor and the physically or mentally challenged people; facilitated the development of e-commerce and social enterprise; increased the national income per capita and reduced the unemployment rate; revised the capital gains tax to create a fairer society; implemented the K-12 education reform as well as the vocational education reform; and passed a series of strict regulations regarding environmental protection.

During his Berggruen Fellowship year at CASBS, Yi-huah Jiang will reflect on how social harmony and individual freedom can be reconciled in modern society from the perspectives of both comparative political philosophy and public policy. He thinks this question is particularly pressing in East Asian countries where conventional norms that tend to promote patriotism and solidarity at the cost of individual autonomy are undergoing structural transformation.
Li  chenyang
Chenyang Li
BPCC Fellow, Academic Board
Chenyang Li is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, where he also founded and directs the Philosophy program. He has previously served as Professor and Chair of the Philosophy Department at Central Washington University (USA), where he received the University Distinguished Research Professor Award, Outstanding Department Chair Award, and the Key to Success Award (Student Service). His main research interests are Chinese philosophy and comparative philosophy. He has published 9 books, including The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony (2013), The Tao Encounters the West: Explorations in Comparative Philosophy (1999), The Sage and the Second Sex (ed. 2000), The East Asian Challenge for Democracy: Political Meritocracy in Comparative Perspective (co-edited with Daniel Bell, 2013), Moral Cultivation and Confucian Character: Engaging Joel J. Kupperman (co-edited with Peimin Ni, 2014), and over 100 journal articles and book chapters in such venues as Philosophy East and West, Journal of Chinese Philosophy, Asian Philosophy, Review of Metaphysics, Journal of Value Inquiry, Hypathia, International Philosophical Quarterly, Philosophia, and Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy. He was an ACE fellow (2008-2009) and the first president of the Association of Chinese Philosophers in Northern America (1995-1997). He is currently Vice President of the International Society for Chinese Philosophy and serves on the editorial/academic boards of 22 publications and scholarly organizations.
Wong  david
David B. Wong
BPCC Fellow
David B. Wong is the Susan Fox Beischer and George D. Beischer Professor of Philosophy at Duke University. He has written essays in contemporary ethical theory, moral psychology, and on classical Chinese philosophy, including “Cultivating the Self in Concert with Others,” Dao Companion to the Analects (2013)ed. Amy Olberding, “Emotion and the Cognition of Reasons in Moral Motivation,” Philosophical Issues (2009), "Cultural Pluralism and Moral Identity", in Personality, Identity, and Character: Explorations in Moral Psychology (2009) , ed. Darcia Narvaez and Dan Lapsley, “The Meaning of Detachment in Daoism, Buddhism, and Stoicism,” Dao (2006), and “Is There a Distinction between Reason and Emotion in Mencius?” Philosophy East and West (1991). His books are Moral Relativity (University of California Press, 1984) and Natural Moralities: A Defense of Pluralistic Relativism (2006, Oxford University Press)